Share the story
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 20
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Strong winds can be a gardener’s worst nightmare, especially salty winds in coastal areas. However, there are plenty of plants for gardens with high wind.

There are things you can do to help reduce the amount of breeze flowing in your garden. There are also shrubs and trees you can plant that deal with the wind very well.

So, to help out, here are some different plants suited to strong winds, including coastal salty winds. Find out how you can still have a thriving garden, no matter where you live!

Plant for the wind

Before trying to block the breeze, embrace it!

Below are some plants that are good at tolerating strong winds, but if none of these take your fancy, try some ornamental grasses first, they enjoy the wind and I think they look spectacular when swaying around in the breeze. Not only that but the soundtrack of sweeping grass will be sure to add to your garden atmosphere.

Remember that you want plants that have pliable branches and deep roots such as the following.

Acer platanoides

Amorpha canescens

Carpinus betulus

Choisya ternata

Cotoneaster sominsii

Crataegus x lavalleei ‘Carrierei’

Daisies

Daylillies

Erysimum

Fraxinus ornus

Hollies

Hydrangea

Laurus nobilis

Lavender

Miscanthus

Philadelphus ‘Belle Etoile’

Phormium tenax

Rosa Felicia

Rosa Celeste

Zinnia

Lavender-sprigs-in-lemon-drink
Lavender-sprigs-in-lemon-drink

Plants for the coast

If you live in or near the coast, you may experience problems with wind. Winds near the coast carry salt, making leaves and branches appear burnt. Even if you live a few miles in land, you may be struggling with planting in your garden.

The following plants are very hardy and tolerate salt winds extremely well.

Achillea

Acer

Arundinaria

Alchemilla mollis

Armeria (sea pink)

Calendula

Centranthus (valerian)

Crocosmia (montbretia)

Cordyline

Crataegus

Cytisus (broom)

Dietes bicolor

Echium

Erigeron (fleabane)

Eryngium (sea holly)

Eucalyptus

Fraxinus angustifolia

Fuchsia magellanica

Genista aetnensis

Griselinia littoralis

Hebe

Helianthemum (rock rose)

Lavandula

Leycesteria formosa

Limonium (stacice)

Olearia

Phormium

Rosa

Rosemary

Sedum

Thyme

Lavender-sprigs-in-lemon-drink
Lavender-sprigs-in-lemon-drink

Build a windbreak

Lavender-sprigs-in-lemon-drink

Alternatively, you can plant or build a windbreak. It’s possible to make them out of artificial solutions but in my experience, these don’t work so well because the wind will just fall over it, rather than being broken. So, you’ll need something semi-permeable.

A suitable semi-permeable barrier can be made from shrubs or trees that filter the wind, only letting around 40%-30% of the wind to pass through. You need plants that are strong rooted.

I’d suggest using wind-tolerant trees and shrubs to make a shelter belt. The following trees and shrubs withstand wind quite well and are strong enough to limit the amount of breeze entering the garden. You may still need to plant tough plants behind the windbreak, but they should develop and withstand even better!

Trees suitable for a windbreak

Arbutus unedo

Carpinus betulus

Hollies

Nothofagus

Prunus lusitanica

Umbellularia californica

Lavender-sprigs-in-lemon-drink

Shrubs suitable for a windbreak

Berberis darwinii

Choisya

Cotoneaster

Hydrangeas

Lavenders

Rosa clauca

Viburnum tinus

When planting your windbreak, be mindful of the fact that it can spoil the view, or cause shade where you don’t want it, so be sure to take these things into consideration when planning.

An alternative would be to build a small bank with a few shrubs planted on top, and this will help restrict wind in the lower levels of the garden.

So, don’t shy away from your windy garden and use suitable plants and measures to make your breezy garden a beautiful and peaceful place to relax!

For more info on windy gardens, read this:

Or check out my Pinterest board for more ideas:

Wild wind
Pinterest
Pinterest Board


Share the story
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 20
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •